Black Sea Salted Caramel Cookies

Ah, the memories. I love nothing better than a classic salted caramel cookie. No wait. Even better is a black sea salted caramel cookie. I have evidence that I baked these as early as 2011. Over the years, I’ve evolved the recipe slightly from the original which no longer seems to exist on the web.


Here are some pro tips.

  • If you really like these, buy the caramels in the 2 kg bags. Safeway has them around Halloween. I apolgize for the photo. Half the bag has mysteriously disappeared.
  • You can also get them in smaller bags at London Drugs. I’ve also seen them at Dollar Tree.
  • I got my black sea salt directly from Maui. It is definitely worth the trip if you can go. If not, Silk Road Spice Merchant carries it in town. You don’t have to use black sea salt. But you should agree, it looks much better.
  • Plan on baking some extra. There will inevitably be some exploding caramels. Who can’t use some extra cookies?
  • These are going to make you a hit with all your friends. Don’t ask me how I know…
  • They freeze really well. Remember to separate the layers with wax paper.
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Black Sea Salted Caramel Cookies
Servings
Ingredients
Servings
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Heat the oven to 375°F. Line two half sheet cookie pans with parchment paper or even better, Silpats.
  2. In a large mixing bowl, beat the butter and sugar until creamy.
  3. Add the egg, vanilla and milk; beat until mixed.
  4. In a medium bowl, combine the baking soda, baking powder, pudding mix, and flour.
  5. Gradually add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients, mixing until combined.
  6. Shape the cookie dough into one-inch balls. For each cookie, place a half a caramel candy in the center and wrap the cookie dough around the candy.
  7. Put the sea salt into a shallow dish. Dip the top of the cookie into the salt.
  8. Place the dough balls, with the bottom slightly flattened onto prepared cookie pans about 2 inches apart.
  9. Bake 10-12 minutes or until the cookie edges are light golden brown.
  10. Allow the cookies to cool 5 minutes before transferring to cooling racks to cool completely.
Recipe Notes

Adapted from http://www.littlebittybakes.com/2011/09/blue-ribbon-sea-salted-caramel-cookies/

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Instant Pot Cassoulet

Cassoulet is a hearty French stew of meat and beans. Perfect comfort food for Canadian fall and winter. Made easier with the Instant Pot. This recipe is modified from one no longer on the web, but it’s original remains. A classic from Thomas Keller. I’ve made it a couple of times and I quite enjoy it. I find it hard to procure chicken garlic sausage, you could use chicken sausage or even mild Italian sausage. I wouldn’t call this a traditional cassoulet but it is pretty darn tasty.

Instant Pot IP-DUO60

Cassoulet
Cassoulet

Print Recipe
Instant Pot Cassoulet with lots of Veggies
Adapted from Thomas Keller (http://www.williams-sonoma.com/recipe/thomas-kellers-slow-cooker-cassoulet.html)
Course Main Dish
Cuisine French
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 50 minutes including venting
Passive Time 50 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
Course Main Dish
Cuisine French
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 50 minutes including venting
Passive Time 50 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Season the pork ribs generously with salt and pepper; set aside.
  2. Set pressure cooker to Sauté to heat up the insert. Add the bacon to the insert and cook until crisp on both sides, about 5 minutes. Drain on paper towels. Reserve the bacon fat in the insert.
  3. Add half of the pork to the insert and brown on all sides, 7 to 8 minutes total. Transfer to a platter. Repeat with the remaining pork.
  4. Add the onions, carrot, celery, zucchini, kale and 1 teaspoon salt to the insert and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, about 7 minutes. Add the wine and simmer until reduced by half, about 8 minutes. Stir in the tomato paste, tomatoes and broth. Turn off the Sauté feature. Add the pork, sausage, beans, rosemary, thyme, parsley, bay leaf, kombu and garlic. Stir everything to combine.
  5. Place the lid on the pressure and lock into place. Press the Meat/Stew Button. When done, release pressure naturally. If pressed for time, NPR for 10 minutes then open the vent. Remove lid, skim off the fat, and remove and discard the bay leaf and piece of kombu. Adjust the seasonings with kosher salt and pepper.
  6. Ladle cassoulet into individual serving bowls, top with reserved bacon and fresh minced parsley. Serve with crusty rolls on the side.
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Stomach Flu

I’m recovering from a bout of gastroenteritis AKA the stomach flu for about a week now. This is the worst case of gastro I have ever had. Well, the other adult in my house had it worse than me… I was confined to my bed for 1.5 days due to extreme fatigue, muscle aches and headache. Three days of runny diarrhea. Nausea and stomach upset. Intolerance to coffee and dairy. 3 lbs lost. I guess it’s not that bad compared to my bout of gastritis earlier this year which left me with a modified diet for a month and spearheaded a weight loss of 15 lbs. Which I needed but that’s besides the point.

After a week, here is what I did to get myself back on my feet.

1) I never stopped having my kefir for breakfast. Even when I just couldn’t eat. I stuck with a half portion of steel cut oats with blueberries, honey and kefir. I took out the flax, hemp hearts, tumeric, black pepper, prunes and granola.

2) When the diarrhea stopped, i started having a small serving of real, fermented kimchi a day. I moved to twice a day, the changed to real fermented sauerkraut (Thanks Holy Kraut!) a few times a day.

3) My order of Florastor arrived today and I started taking that.

4) I avoided coffee after it started upsetting my stomach and just returned to it  today with no ill effects.

5) The only dairy I have eaten is the kefir, and a tiny amount of shredded cheese on a toddler sized portion of pizza.  I’m going to try ice cream tomorrow and see what happens.

6) I stocked up on probiotic foods to replenish the good bacteria. I prefer food to supplements so that I know I am getting live bacteria. This just knocked the wind out of me so I went with the pills (Florastor) for the first time.

7) I normally eat a diet rich in prebiotics. Prebiotics are food for the bacteria. Oatmeal, raw fruits and veggies anything with a substantial fibre component.

Here are my purely unscientific, foodie opinions on gut flora, and building a better microbiome. I think this is a trending topic these days.

Lactose intolerance. I was never lactose intolerant growing up. I used to chug a few glasses of milk every day. Over the years I have developed intolerance to varying degrees, so much that I have cut out drinking milk from the glass in my diet. I have built tolerance to the point that I can consume yogurt, cheese, ice cream and butter in moderate quantities with no issue.  A few things do affect my tolerance for dairy. Hormone shifts, and any type of gastrointestinal inflammation.  I get diarrhea and I know I’ve had too much. Well, with the gastritis, I pretty much couldn’t eat anything.

Caffeine intolerance. I have had this many times. Definitely hormone influenced. Also influenced by gastrointestinal inflammation.  I get nauseated when my tolerance is low. I’m not a huge coffee drinker, but when my tolerance is good, I can drink 3 cups a day. I normally drink one or two.

Jellyfish intolerance. This one is strange. I am not allergic  to seafood, but I throw up shortly after eating it.

Soy intolerance. This one is also strange. I used to eat a lot of tofu growing up. But I suspect it gave me awful periods because of the phytoestrogen. I can eat fermented soy like miso, soy sauce and tempeh. But I need to steer clear of tofu (which I love), soymilk and edamame. One serving every couple of weeks is fine.

I am a foodie. I have tried all sorts of things.  Century eggs, chicken feet, stinky tofu, sweetmeats, natto, durian, fungus other than mushrooms, blue rare beef, pretty well all shellfish (I love crab guts!) and some kind of preserved clam that smells like stinky socks. Even with my penchant for local, healthy and organic food, I still venture to the Chinese grocery store and buy those unidentified packages of dried ingredients my mom used to cook, mostly in soup, in my childhood. Who knows what they put in that stuff. Ok, there are a few things I won’t eat. Insects, worms, and some others that aren’t top of mind right now. Oh, and this!

I think with a diversity in diet comes a huge diversity in the bacteria that populate the gut. I have no identifiable food allergies, just intolerances. I suspect that my eagerness to try new foods as a youth has given me a healthy gut. I read some research somewhere that people in developing countries have a more diverse gut microbiome than westernized countries and less incidence of food allergies.

I have traveled a bit, but not in the last ten years or so. I’ve been to Mexico (not a resort), Belize (island kayaking and camping), Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong (love the street food!) and Great Britain. The US. doesn’t count. My trip to SE Asia was with GAP Adventures and it was stay where the locals stay, eat where they eat kind of a trip. I only got sick once, and that was in Thailand. I suspect that I may have my gut microbiome to thank for my tolerance.

After my bout with gastritis, I caught 2 colds in a row. I didn’t even recover from the first before I got the second. Even with kids, before the gastritis, I caught very few colds.  There is definitely a link between the gut and the immune system.

Moral of the story? Trust your gut. Take care of it, and it will take care of you. Full stop.

Whitehall

Yes, this blog is still alive, sort of. I took hubby out for his birthday dinner about a month ago to Whitehall. I was looking for something different; and a modern take on British influenced cuisine fit the bill. Whitehall has been around for a couple of years and I’ve always been curious about it. It’s a restaurant that has a Michelin starred touch, thanks to its chef.

I enjoyed the decor; “The Other Room” sign was hung over the entrance to well, the other room. Service was very good, with the attention to  detail that could be expected of a place with such a pedigree.

After a lot of thought, we both decided to go with the Chef’s Tasting menu as shown in the pictures below. The whipped pork rind was topped with chili which added a nice pop. The butter tasted like, well, butter.

I do like fine food without the pretentiousness of fine dining. This place fits the bill. The bread was served fittingly in a paper bag.

Whipped pork rinds, cow butter

The salad course came with an interesting twist. Stilton snow. I’m not a big fan of Stilton cheese, but the snow added a hint of subtlety to tone down the flavour.

Salt baked pickled shallot and beets with stilton snow

Hen of the Woods mushrooms are a British thing. My husband told me so. They are also a Japanese thing, known as Maitake in the Land of the Rising Sun. This dish is a nod to the Japanese influence, with the tartness of the yuzu complimenting the earthiness of the mushroom.

Maitaki (Hen of the woods) mushrooms with pickled ginger and yuzu sauce

The risotto was my least preferred dish, through no fault of the chef. Each of the previous dishes had one bold flavour with a supporting cast. The main act didn’t come out in this dish, but perhaps that was the intent.

Toasted barley and watercress risotto with cured salmon

This course was by far my favourite. The potatoes were crisped in a rich, buttery skin. I could have ate them all night long. The lamb was done to a perfect medium rare. The kebabs were herby spicy and the chutney complimented the lamb sirloin nicely.

Lamb sirloin and kebabs with cucumber pickles, mint chutney and fingerling potatoes

The pine parfait was interesting. The undertones of pine flavour matched well with the richness of the chocolate.

Pine parfait with pine oil cookie crumble, chocolate wafer and cranberry coulis honey crackle wafer

I really like the bold flavours which takes a cuisine not known for boldness to another level. Hubby would love a return visit.

Poppy seed parmesan biscuit

Whitehall Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Roast Beef on the BBQ

I love good roast beef. Before scrolling further, I have a disclaimer. I like it rare. I’ve been known to eat it blue rare. So, if the sight of rare beef offends you, close your browser now.

Still reading? Great. I bought a prime rib roast at my favourite butcher shop, Master Meats. This one weighed in at almost 5 lbs. I like to do my roasts occasionally on the BBQ and today I also decided I wanted to publish the recipe. So here you go.

Serve it with your favourite brown roux. Mine was simple. Separated the fat from the pan drippings, added enough oil to the fat to make 1/4 cup. Cooked that with 1/4 cup flour to form a paste. Added in the pan drippings and 1.5 cups of veggie stock using 1/2 a bouillon cube.  Brought to a simmer. Then adjusted salt and pepper to taste.

Four lbs and eleven ounces
Seasoned for the grill
Smoking hot
I love rare beef

Rare beef

Print Recipe
Roast Beef on the BBQ
Servings
Ingredients
Servings
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Preheat the grill to high.
  2. Prep roast by coating liberally with salt and pepper. Place in a cast iron pan. Cover with foil. Let it sit to come to room temperature, about 15 - 20 minutes.
  3. Calculate the cooking time as follows: 15 min per kg/hour for medium rare @325F. 18-20min per kg/hour for medium @325F.
  4. Turn off middle burner. The roast needs to be cooked on indirect heat. Place roast in middle and cook @ 425F for 30 min. This is around the high setting.
  5. Turn remaining burners down to medium and monitor the temperature. Cook at the calculated cooking time from step 3 at 325F.
  6. When done, remove roast, keep covered and let sit for at least 15 min before carving.
  7. Serve with brown gravy.
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OEB Breakfast Co.

I’m sorry… to make you wait. I’ve been waiting to write this post since… oh about October when I finally got around to checking out OEB Breakfast Co. at their downtown Calgary location. I’ve always wanted to go to their original location up Edmonton Trail, but never patient enough to play the waiting game. But I’m so glad that I did. That is, wait to go downtown.

First off, they are using the NoWait app. I love this app. Secured my spot in line just before we drove out the door. As we waited patiently for our table, I felt sorry for the walkins, just looking for a decent breakfast. No lineup in sight, to be told that the wait would be an hour.

The decor was most interesting. They got cracking on the egg motif. There was an egg shaped seating arrangement that I swear was straight out of Mork and Mindy. We were seated at the end of a long table that was made for sharing. I wouldn’t go for an intimate conversation unless you wanted to be best buddies with your neighbors.

The menu was more interesting. Think gourmet + breakfast. Lobster? Check. Crab? Check? Peking Duck? Check. Rabbit? Check. It sounds a like a who’s who of the best gourmet dining in town. I settled, I really did. For the croque madam. I’ll come back for the lobster next time, I promise.

The service was fast as my dish got served before I could figure out what to order for my next visit. It was very tasty with a rich hollandaise sauce. The richness of the dish was offset by the fruit plate on the side.

Our server was friendly, but as I commented to hubby, that this was a truly indulgent breakfast and not one to take lightly. Farewell for now, and next time I will be back with some foodie friends in tow.

Croque Madame
Sunny side eggs, brioche, tartufata, San Daniele prosciutto, Manchego cheese, fresh fruit
Menu, partial

OEB Breakfast Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Turkey Congee in the Instant Pot

After Christmas dinner was done, the remains of an 18 lb turkey were begging for some inspiration. Being a little lazy and needing a meal that could cope with frozen leftovers, turkey congee seemed like a suitable choice. I sort of defrosted the turkey carcass in the oven (at the same time roasting it) and it turned out beautifully.

Prior to roasting the turkey, I dried brined it for a few days and threw some kosher salt, black pepper and lemons into the cavity. I didn’t have to season the congee much after it was done cooking, as all the wonderful flavours from inside the carcass and the umami from roasting the bones did the job.

It seems to be, like all congee that I’ve made in the Instant Pot, a little thick. To make it less thick, add some hot water prior to serving or cold water before reheating in the microwave or on the stovetop.

My toddlers were begging for seconds. I knew then, it was a winner!

IMG_20161225_135408_907
Roasted turkey
Roasted turkey congee
Roasted turkey congee

 

Print Recipe
Turkey Congee in the Instant Pot
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 90 minutes
Passive Time 75 minutes
Servings
cups
Ingredients
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 90 minutes
Passive Time 75 minutes
Servings
cups
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Add rice to pot.
  2. Roast turkey carcass in the oven at 400 F for 30 minutes or until aroma develops. Let cool and break it up into pieces to fit the pot. Add to pot.
  3. Peel and julienne ginger. Add to pot.
  4. Add water and sesame oil.
  5. Cover and set to porridge for 40 minutes. 15 minutes NPR and then vent if preferred or NPR until float drops.
  6. Remove the carcass. Peel the meat off and add back to pot if desired. Stir in the extra turkey meat. Add salt to taste. Mind the bones that might be left!
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Instant Pot Recipes and Tips

Update: Originally posted on November 30, 2016. Edited to help my many friends new to the Instant Pot.

So Amazon.ca had a Black Friday deal for the Instant Pot IP-DUO60 7-in-1 multifunction cooker. I bought one of these way back in July on Prime Day. For my new round of soon to be Instant Pot lovers, here are some of my more successful recipes. I live in Calgary, Alberta and there is a small adjustment for altitude with some of my recipes.

Here are some tips.

  1. Read the instructions. The control panel is not that intuitive. But if you read the instructions, you won’t get any surprises.
  2. Amy and Jacky’s website is a great resource for pressure cooking. Check out their tips for beginners. Go over the acronyms before reading the rest of this post.
  3. The steam from the vent is very hot. I would not set the cooker underneath your kitchen cupboards. I might add, if you prefer to QR, set the pot under the hood fan prior to cooking.
  4. Here are some more tips on venting. It’s a pressure cooker. Which means that contents are under pressure.  The pressure must be released before the lid is opened. If you are really in a hurry then you can QR right after the cooking time is done. To do this, cover the vent with a proper tea towel. I wouldn’t recommend a small dish towel. Use a wooden spoon to slowly nudge the vent open. Close it if the water and steam come out too fast. Repeat this step a couple of times until the pressure eases enough that the vent can be left fully open.
  5. My preferred venting method is 10 minutes NPR, followed by a QR. Under the hood fan if the pot is at least two thirds full.
  6. It says that it only takes xx minutes to cook? Really!?!
    No. Not really. It takes between 5-15 minutes to warm up. Depending on how full the pot is.  Then I usually wait 10 minutes after it’s done so I don’t get scalded when trying to open the vent. How full the pot is determines how long it will take for the pressure to drop. I would add at least another 15 minutes using the 10 min NPR and vent method. Longer on the back end if the pot is close to full.
  7. It’s a very safe pressure cooker. I’ve tried opening it (by accident) when the float was still up and it wouldn’t let me do it. Having said that, I have had a few mishaps. It’s not the Instant Pot, it’s just me.
  8. Don’t close the lid while sauteing.
  9. If you are slow cooking, you don’t need to completely cover your meat with liquid.
  10. If you like to slow cook and serve say, mulled apple cider at a party, I would use a regular pot lid that fits the inner pot. Leave the pot on keep warm and let the guests serve themselves. The regular lid is awkward for beginners to use.
  11. If you are steaming, put at least 1 cup of water in the bottom. Then add a trivet.
  12. Most recipes on the web don’t adjust for altitude. This might matter in some cases. I’ve found, for example, I need more water for steel cut oats. Also more time.
  13. Here’s some fail safe rice recipes. I haven’t tried any of them. I’m sure they are fine at sea level.
  14. Burning question (Literally!) Have I had any cooking accidents? Yes! One time I got distracted and accidentally put 1/2 a cup of rice into the pot without the inner pot. Then I dumped the other 1/2 into the inner pot, put the pot on the element, added water and turned it on. Oops! Cue burning smell. And another Instant Pot. I also managed to steam veggies on low in 1/2 cup of water. That didn’t work so I tried it again on high. By then all the water was gone and all I heard were some clunking noises. Of the trivet vibrating on the bottom of the pot. Moral of the story: add 1 cup of water. I’ve also dropped a pot liner and made a dent in it. I contacted customer service and they said it was A-ok to use!

Instant Pot IP-DUO60

Recipes

Here is a selection of mostly my own recipes that I have used successfully in Calgary. Your mileage may vary. Comment on my Facebook page if you would like more recipe suggestions. I’m currently working on converting my Bengali Daal recipe. I’ve tried Lu rou fan (Taiwanese beef stew), Bo kho  (Vietnamese beef stew), pho, chili, congee, see yau kai (soy sauce chicken), beef and barley soup, pulled pork, baked beans, spaghetti bolognese, Mexican carnitas, beef stroganoff, BBQ ribs, barbacoa de cordero (lamb Mexican style), and cassoulet. There, I just went through my whole recipe binder.

I’ve also included my butter chicken recipe, a twist on an all time favorite of mine. Warning – it is a fusion style recipe. Scroll way to the bottom for this one.

Grains
Steel cut oats
Jasmine rice
Wild rice blend
Bulgur

Beans
French lentils

Vegetables
Carrots
Cauliflower
Potatoes

Protein
Hard boiled eggs
Pulled pork

Soup Style
Turkey congee
Cassoulet

Steel cut oats

I eat steel cut oats for breakfast every morning. Once a week, I whip up a large batch and store it in the fridge. I like mine creamy/chunky and definitely not dry.

1 1/3 cups oats                       2 1/3 cups oats
2.5 cups water                         7.5 cups water (1775 ml)

Manual low pressure for 10 minutes, natural release 12 minutes then vent

Carrots for kids
Use large square glass dish with trivet & 1 C of water in the pot
6 min manual, high pressure, natural release

Potatoes
14 min. steam on high

Cauliflower
3 min manual, high, quick release

Jasmine rice
1 C rice to 1.25 C water
Rice setting, 10 min natural release

Wild rice blend

I whipped up some wild rice pilaf this past Thanksgiving. Last year it took me over an hour on the stovetop. Of constant watching and stirring.

1 cups wild rice
1 cups wild rice blend
4 cups water

Manual low pressure for 30 minutes, natural release 10 minutes then vent

French lentils
1 C lentils
2 C water 15 minutes manual high pressure, natural release 10 minutes then vent

Bulgur
1 C bulgur (wheat berries)
3 C water 25-30 minutes manual high pressure, natural release 10 minutes then vent

Hard boiled eggs
Pour one cup of water into the pot. Place eggs on rack that came with the pot, or use a steamer basket. 5 minutes on high then vent. Rinse with cold water so I could handle them and voila! Perfect eggs.

Pulled pork

I really liked this  root beer pulled pork. recipe  It has a hint of root beer flavour with a vanilla aftertaste. It sounds strange but it works.

Print Recipe
Fusion Butter Chicken for Instant Pot
Butter chicken is a lovely dish, but time consuming to cook it properly. This recipe works well with the Instant Pot. The original version takes me about an hour on the stovetop.
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Passive Time 55 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Passive Time 55 minutes
Servings
people
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Cut chicken into 1 inch pieces. Put into a bowl and add ginger, garlic, red chili powder, turmeric, tandoori powder and salt. Mix well and let sit in the refrigerator for 30 minutes, or overnight.
  2. Before cooking, take out the chicken and let it stand for 10 minutes to come to room temperature. In the Instant Pot, turn on saute and melt 2 tbs of the ghee. Add the crispy fried onions and the chicken. Saute until the chicken is golden brown, just a few minutes. Add one cup of warm water.
  3. Turn off the saute and pressure cook manually on low for 10 minutes.
  4. Natural pressure release for 5 minutes, then open vent.
  5. Meanwhile, heat the remaining butter in a skillet over medium high heat. Add the raisins and the blanched almonds and saute for 1 minute, then set aside.
  6. When the float has dropped on the Instant Pot, open the lid and add one cup of cream to the chicken, then Worchestershire sauce, sugar, cardamom and nutmeg. Stir.
  7. Stir in the reserved raisins and almonds. Serve.
Recipe Notes

Serve with basmati rice. Done in the rice cooker, of course.

Adapted from Simply More Indian & Patrick Dunn

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Deane House

I took hubby out for a late birthday dinner at the end of September. I was looking forward to visiting Deane House again. The last time would have been many years ago. How fortunate that the restaurant had only just opened a few days prior to our visit. We stopped by for lunch.

We were seated in the former patio area that is now enclosed. The decor is sort of a modern-rustic-country charm. Comfortable seating with a touch of country. The staff were new and they were still greasing the wheels. The food was fantastic. The service had some hiccups, but could be forgiven seeing that they were only open a few days.

Their menu is local/regional inspired cuisine.  I enjoyed my grilled albacore tuna.  It was nicely seared on  the outside and the beet dashi complimented it nicely. The pear frangipane tart was divine with the notes of sweetness cut with the sharpness of the ginger. The coolness of the ice cream finished off the bite nicely. I had a bite of hubby’s chocolate pate. It was super rich, without being drowned in sweetness.

The service was quite prompt and attentive to start, but towards the end of the meal, the lunch rush got busier and the our server was nowhere to be found.  They also have a limited non alcoholic beverage selection which I hope they will improve upon. Grizzly Paw soda from Canmore would make a great addition.

 

Deane House
Deane House
Wood Fired Grilled Albacore Tuna
Wood Fired Grilled Albacore Tuna Charred Brussels Leaves, Herbed Spaetzle, Beet Dashi
Pear Frangipane Tart
Pear Frangipane Tart
Theo Chocolate Pate
Theo Chocolate Pate

Deane House Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato